BURDENS ARE LIFTED AT CALVARY                                                  written in 1952

The Story

While working at the Seaman’s Chapel in Glasgow, Scotland, John Moore (1925 – ) received a phone call from a large shipping firm. They asked him to visit a young merchant seaman who was critically ill. John made that hospital visit and, after talking with that sailor, he reached into his briefcase for a gospel tract. That tract was based on the book, Pilgrim’s Progress. The front page showed Christian, the lead character in that book, coming to the cross with a huge burden on his back.

John told that merchant seaman about how Christian had come to the cross and how his burden had been taken away. Then John asked that young man, “Do you feel this burden on your back today?” The seaman nodded his head, so they prayed together. John said, “Never will I forget the smile of peace and assurance that lit up his face when he said his burden was lifted.”

That night, with that conversion conversation and experience fresh on his mind, John wrote this song. And it is such a comforting song… with such an easy tune to sing.

John would continue to be a Baptist pastor in Canada, and – as of this writing – is still alive today.

The Song

            Read this hymn, and – today – if you haven’t already, pray that God will remove your sin burden.

Days are filled with sorrow and care, hearts are lonely and drear;
burdens are lifted at Calvary, Jesus is very near.

CHORUS:
Burdens are lifted at Calvary, Calvary, Calvary.
Burdens are lifted at Calvary, Jesus is very near.

Cast your care on Jesus today, leave your worry and fear;
burdens are lifted at Calvary, Jesus is very near. (Chorus)

Troubled soul, the Saviour can see, ev’ry heartache and tear;
burdens are lifted at Calvary, Jesus is very near. (Chorus)

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